CSA, hours of service, tolls top House’s oversight plans

By Jill Dunn on

The U.S. House transportation committee’s oversight plan for the 113th Congress includes targeting hours of service, the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program and recently expanded ability of states to collect tolls on federal highways.

The committee unveiled its agenda Jan. 23, which encompassed assigning programs and issues for its subcommittees’ focus. Highway subcommittee duties include oversight of trucking regulations, highway construction, developing surface transportation policy and implementing safety and research programs.

The committee noted the most significant HOS final rule provisions will take effect in July. Truckers have said the rule is complex and could reduce productivity, while law enforcement has questioned if additional training is necessary, the committee stated.

The subcommittee requested a CSA audit following a hearing on the program last September. The Department of Transportation Inspector General is expected to complete that audit late this year.

The committee also wants subcommittee members to monitor states expanded capacity to collect tolls from the federal-aid highway system.  The current highway reauthorization legislation allows tolling for projects that add new lane capacity to the Interstate system. Tolling for initial construction of Interstate highways, bridges and tunnels also is now permitted under that legislation.

Members are to assess tolling provisions implementation, how states are using this expanded authority and if changes are warranted

The Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation subcommittee’s tasks include monitoring the Transportation Worker Identification Credential program. A 2002 law established TWIC to ensure transportation workers with access to secure areas of maritime facilities were not security risks. Later, Congress set a July 2007 deadline for deploying the credential to workers and installing TWIC readers in secure areas.

The TSA and Coast Guard did not begin deploying TWIC credentials until October 2007 and the agencies also missed the April 2009 deadline for installing the readers. The Coast Guard does not anticipate issuing final rules for installing readers this year.

9 comments
DOTDoctor
DOTDoctor

I have to agree that much of the issues in this industry lie with the shipper and receiver.  The delay time encountered at these facilities is unnecessary.  Do not call for a truck until you are ready to load or unload.  There is no reason for a driver to spend all his/her hours sitting waiting for a load.  The company's that don't enforce detention on these people in fear of loosing a customer only add to the problem.  Some type of accountability has to be put on these places.

 

The other solution I see, and this would just raise trucking costs terribly to the consumer with no benefit to the trucker, is that we have road trucks that move the goods for the miles.  They come into warehouses where they can drop with a turn time of no more than 1 hour.  Then the goods are cross docked and/or delivered by local drivers who are compensated by the hour.  Once companies have to start paying an hourly wage for this detention, strives will be taken to curtail long wait times.

truckgirl
truckgirl

As a dispatcher, and accountant for my dad, a trucker, I can see what you guys are talking about. We never accept load under $1.50 per mile and even in that going down a much needed $.50 p/m we still sit for day with out load, and we literally have to fight tooth and nail to get layover, and detention charges from the brokers.  What congress should really focus is on the shipper!  If they really want to keep cost down, they must find a way to not waste truckers valuable time.  With HOS regulations as they are, most truckers feel like they are sitting around to long in the day, and on top of that shippers keep them on duty while they take 2 to  8 hours loading! Then they demand their shipment arrive "on Time" They are setting up Drivers to either loose money on late fee or tickets or driving out of regulation, non of which make sense business wise.

03Pete
03Pete

SMH I pull $2.00 a mile freight everyday with a dry van. It's out there if you do a little legwork and find it. If you think it only costs you .75 to move your truck you are clueless on how to setup a business and make any money.

profitable long haul
profitable long haul

SMH  what is the relivance of your post to thia article?   If you are pulling cheap freight you either need a new usiness plan or new job

Shaking my head
Shaking my head

Its really disheartening that they are not smart enough to put attention and focus on the Shippers, Brokers and Hiring Companies (Lumpers) to resolve many time constraints. I own my own trailer, therefore I live load and unload, I make arrangement for two hours on each end for the loading and unloading but realistically I need to expand that accomodation to three hours. Its not uncommon for the Lumper service to take in excess of 4 hours on each end! I have tried to focus on the short haul (250 miles) at this point my business model is a complete failure:

 

Typically a shipper has a load scheduled for pick-up and the delivery is not until the next day; they are paying between $400.00 and $500.00 (Understand they are actually trying to pay $250 to $300) on the load. At a normal customer its two to three hours to unload or load; but if you make it any kind of food product or mass warehouse with lumper services its fair to say 4 hours is the minimum and I have spent as many as 7 hours in one location.

 

I am really disheartened and don't know what to do. I am looking into the mid range runs but the $ per mile drop significantly ( 1.18 ) per mile is not unheard of, I will not even consider moving my truck for that given that its .75 a mile to move the truck and I expect to make .40 a mile in my pocket as a driver; alone that is 1.15 per mile before Uncle Sam bends me over a fender and I have to pay Insurance and related expences!

 

Shaking my head

Shaking my head
Shaking my head

 @03Pete

 I guess the point was unclear; its .75 per mile in Diesel just to move the truck, that is not to mention all of the other costs!

Shaking my head
Shaking my head

 @profitable long haul

 The point of the post and relivence to the article is pretty self explanatory; they are talking about HOS and Rulings. The focus needs to be on the industry as a whole and not just on the truck and the driver. The Truck and Driver have the least control of the shipment out there, point in fact they are often held hostage if a load is late or some other issue when the fact is simple; 70 +% of the issue starts at the shipper!