What happens if America’s trucks stop moving?

By CCJ Staff on

CCJ publisher Randall-Reilly examines the question in depth with its infographic “Truckpocalypse,” showing the toll that a disruption to the transportation industry would have on water supply, hospitals, food, merchandise, fuel and the economy as a whole. Click here to see the infographic. 

12 comments
oklaroadrunner
oklaroadrunner

So I take it none of you have been paying attention to what is happening this weekend Oct 11 - 13.

Trucks are headed to Washington and a lot of trucks are parking to help with the protest

oklaroadrunner
oklaroadrunner

None of us want a strike. But, to get peoples attention of what is happening to us in the trucking industry, is a possibility.

Yes, electrical, plumbing healthcare all those are important. Without the goods they need from what trucks bring, it wouldn't  matter. The FMCSA and its conglomerates, are regulating the whole trucking industry to the findings of UPS, FedEx and the other short haul carriers, who are almost all unions. The people need to be heard and the only way we will truly be heard is by shutting down. It gets attention to what we do day in and day out and what we have to deal with. These TV shows aren't the truth. They are staged to show glamour and glitz. Most people focus on" hey the gas prices are going down"  next time you buy gas, look at the cost of Diesel fuel. It is at least 60 cents higher. The freight prices are going down but, the price in the stores are going up and by the way, we are blamed for it. So, support what is happening this weekend and stock up before.

My trucks are off the road. I paid my drivers for the time off so they can survive for a few days. 

car wrap | truck wrap
car wrap | truck wrap

I took the time to read all the comments, but I really liked the article. It proved to be very helpful to me, and I believe all the critics here! Always good when you can not just be told, but!

Cathy Gautreaux
Cathy Gautreaux

As one of the 50 who are responsible for protecting and defending the trucking industry on a regular basis, I face the fact that the public takes the trucking industry for granted on a regular basis.  Only in the event of a disaster -- hurricane, flood, etc. -- do they come to appreciate the truck drivers and the industry.  Anything that helps us bring the message of the importance of the trucking industry to their every day lives is helpful. I like this...a lot!

David McQueen
David McQueen

Hypothetical doomsday scenarios are interesting but one could say the same thing about any industry.  What would happen if all the electrical workers went on strike or all the medical treatment personnel stopped working?  What would happen if all waiters and waitresses stayed home?  The government wouldn't have a clue as to a solution (other than using force to make people go back to work).  For a small group, such as ATCs, they could all be fired and replaced.  Not so the commercial motor vehicle operators, medical treatment, electrical workers, etc. who require a level of training that precludes instant replacement.

My Bud Hauls Bud
My Bud Hauls Bud

I agree with all here so far in one way or another.  My husband isn't union, but I fear for his company's staying afloat everyday. They've been doing well, better than in the past few months, but I believe that any of those involved whether a driver or us wives and family worry about the happenings in the trucking industry especially shut downs and loss of jobs, and now a possible strike.  A strike indeed could be devistating to our country. People lose sight of what is a FACT: if you have it, a trucker delivered it.  My prayer is that a strike never happens and as another said, the folks  "get off their butts and do something for the trucker rather than hurting him."  As a trucker's wife, you all have my prayers and do stay safe out there.

Dmurphy
Dmurphy

Well this is the real story. the What if story is something we need to think about . Somebody needs to get off their butts and do something to help the trucker instead of hurting him.

Rick Gresham
Rick Gresham

I agree with nogle1 and ttrucking, the gubermint wouldn't allow this to happen and too many truckers are too close to the edge financially to willfully shut down, go to jail and face stiff penalties for violating court orders, etc. I wonder about a different scenario however.  Suppose (this is an exercise in imagination, after all), suppose somebody comes along with a whiz-bang widget that can power trucks and cars without fuel but has limited production initially.  If the trucking sector really is running on 1%-2% margins as reported and fuel is the biggest expense then those companies that obtain the technology first can underbid everyone else by just a little and get all the business.  If it continues very long, it seems possible a large number of trucking companies could go under.  Not as dramatic as what's depicted in the graphic but could be chaotic.

ttrucking
ttrucking

probably right but it needs to happen long enough to get gov. attention before they put us all on unempolyment

Jamie Sather
Jamie Sather

It could happen and it would play out just like this!

nogle1
nogle1

Never happen, would be legislated back to work in hours!

oklaroadrunner
oklaroadrunner

As strong willed as most drivers are. You really think Obama could make them go back to work?

A real truck driver will stand their ground. Take into consideration, trucking is already working at a deficit. 



Must Clicks

Events

From Our Partners