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Mack Pinnacle (2010 and newer)

Mack Pinnacle

Mack Pinnacle tractors are constructed on a lightweight-yet-strong chassis that helps these trucks maximize every drop of fuel. Pinnacle models are offered in axle-forward or axle-back configurations and feature industry-leading electronics, an ergonomic dashboard and a quiet reinforced cab.


Featured reviews:

20-truck tanker fleet in Southeast

4.1 Rating
Reviewer Comments We’re on our second batch of Macks now and they do fine.

We have 10 Mack Pinnacles and are very pleased with them. Our company has been a Mack fleet for some time now. We ran Sterlings for a little while, and that was a mistake. Finally went full Mack in 2006. We’re on our second batch of Macks now and they do fine.

The first batch we had we had emissions problems with them. The EGR cooler would leak. But they’ve straightened that out. We’re having a little problem now with the urea injectors. But our technician has figured that out so it’s not a big deal.

Our drivers like that truck. My only issue is weight. We’re a tanker fleet, so we need to save weight any way we can. I’m looking at 6×2 axles as one way of doing that.

See the breakdown
  • Overall aesthetics 5
  • Suitability for your application/business 5
  • Overall vehicle reliability/durability 4
  • Overall vehicle design 5
  • Serviceability 4
  • OEM support 5
  • Dealer support 5
  • Fuel economy 3
  • Vehicle cost per mile 3
  • Acquisition cost 3
  • Resale value 3

400-truck van fleet in Southeast

3.5 Rating
Reviewer Comments I like them a lot. They’re good handling trucks. Most of our drivers like them, too.

We run about 150 Macks – most are sleepers in dry van runs. I like them a lot. They’re good handling trucks. Most of our drivers like them, too. They have plenty of power. And it’s a little smaller design than the Volvo. So it’s easier to maneuver in the city. The downside to that is there’s not as much cab room as you see on a Volvo or a Freightliner. The drivers tell me they don’t have as much headroom.

They’re easy to work on – if you have the engine software. If you don’t have the software, you’re like a peg-legged man at an ass-kicking contest. But overall, they’re easy trucks to maintain.

See the breakdown
  • Overall aesthetics 4
  • Suitability for your application/business 4
  • Overall vehicle reliability/durability 4
  • Overall vehicle design 3
  • Serviceability 4
  • OEM support 3
  • Dealer support 4
  • Fuel economy 3
  • Vehicle cost per mile 4
  • Acquisition cost 4
  • Resale value 2

15-truck flatbed fleet in Canada

2.3 Rating
Reviewer Comments We’re running 14 of them in construction/vocational applications – out to jobsites, flatbeds, that sort of thing. It’s a perfect truck for our needs.

We’re traditionally a Mack fleet. We’re running 14 of them in construction/vocational applications – out to jobsites, flatbeds, that sort of thing.

It’s a perfect truck for our needs. My only issue with them are all the fault codes we get today. The dash clock goes down and all these fault codes hit you. That’s a pain. But it’s an easy truck to work on. We do most of our service work here, besides the computer stuff, which goes straight to Mack. Other than that, though, we have no issues with the truck. Our drivers really like them, too.

See the breakdown
  • Overall aesthetics 3
  • Suitability for your application/business 5
  • Overall vehicle reliability/durability 2
  • Overall vehicle design 2
  • Serviceability 2
  • OEM support 1
  • Dealer support 2
  • Fuel economy 2
  • Vehicle cost per mile 2
  • Acquisition cost 3
  • Resale value 1

*Averaged from 5 qualified fleet reviews

3.3 Average*
  • Overall aesthetics 4
  • Suitability for your application/business 4.4
  • Overall vehicle reliability/durability 3.2
  • Overall vehicle design 3.2
  • Serviceability 3.2
  • OEM support 3.2
  • Dealer support 3.4
  • Fuel economy 3
  • Vehicle cost per mile 3
  • Acquisition cost 3.4
  • Resale value 2.4