TCA fleet panel says driver shortage will intensify with HOS changes

By Aaron Huff on

imageOn Tuesday, March 5, an executive panel representing three large carriers gave their take on the economy, changes in regulations and the impact to their businesses at the Truckload Carriers Association’s annual convention in Las Vegas.

The panel, moderated by Lana Batts, co-president of Driver iQ, said freight volumes receded in the latter half of 2012 and have since picked up. The driver shortage has intensified, however, and likely will grow worse this summer when changes to the hours of service (HOS) rules take effect.

The new HOS rules require drivers to take one, 30-minute break within the first 8 hours of coming on duty. Drivers that use the reset provision will have to go off-duty for a minimum of 34 hours that must include two consecutive 1-5 A.M. periods.

“In the last four weeks we’ve seen the number of driver applicants drop almost 20 to 25 percent,” said panelist Max Fuller, chairman and chief executive of U.S. Xpress. Fuller believes the drop is due to drivers pursuing opportunities outside the industry, such as in construction. He believes the shortage will intensify after July 1 with the HOS changes. Fuller estimates that U.S. Xpress could see a drain in productivity by more than 10 percent.

Changes to HOS and other recent regulations have infuriated many of the veteran drivers at Werner Enterprises who have been in the industry for more than 15 years. They are “throwing their hands up and saying “’I’m done. If not today then soon after,’” said panelist Derek Leathers, the company’s president and chief operating officer. “My bigger concern is the quality of the men and women in this industry that we lose simply because they choose to not participate any longer with some of the intrusions.”

Leathers estimates HOS changes will impact productivity less than 10 percent. Carriers will have to find ways to at least maintain and hopefully increase drivers’ earnings, he said.

“It is in all of our best interests to continue doing a better job of building a pay package that’s more specific to the type of work (drivers) are doing and hopefully, through our collective efforts, to impress upon the shippers the importance of paying a decent wage to these men and women.”

“The cost has to be passed on,” agreed panelist Dan England, chairman of Salt Lake City-based C.R. England. “Unfortunately the driver is caught in the crossfire.” England says that the HOS changes will add an additional 6 to 12 hours to the current runs in its dedicated fleets.

On the bright side the HOS changes could shrink capacity in the industry and put upward pressure on rates.

“This will be in all likelihood the last nail in the capacity coffin as it relates to how tightly this thing will get,” Leathers said. A shrink in capacity by three to five percent will lock up capacity in a hurry and cause carriers to collapse around their key customers, he added.

The panel also discussed ways to use technology to create efficiency and opportunities for improvement. U.S. Xpress, for instance, has seen its average length of haul decrease from 1,700 to 530 miles. This transition required developing tools to analyze its business and improve productivity.

U.S. Xpress has created dashboards to pull together information from various sources to monitor its operations.

“With the dashboards we can measure a lot more things than we did in the past. A shorter length of haul really dictates the need for better statistics,” Fuller said.

C.R. England has used driver-load optimization technology to dramatically improve productivity. It is also using lane departure, forward collision warning and roll stability control systems in the cab to increase driver safety. England warned that such technology should not be used as a bandage, however.

“We better make sure we are putting a driver in that cab who has been sufficiently trained—first who has been sufficiently vetted to make sure he or she is a qualified person to be in that cab—and then training them properly and then having ongoing training across all areas where we need to improve performance.”

The panel also discussed the delicate topic of how to manage a family business over time. C.R. England has always had a culture of maintaining good family relationships throughout its four generations of ownership. Dan England entered into an agreement to buy out the company from his three brothers, which became effective December 31, 2012.

“We were able to do it in such a way that we were able to maintain the harmony among us as brothers and as a family,” he said. “I count that as one of my great accomplishments in business and set a model for my four sons who will take the company forward.”

Aaron Huff

Aaron Huff is the Senior Editor of Commercial Carrier Journal. Huff’s career in the transportation industry began at a family-owned trucking company and expanded to CCJ, where for the past 12 years he has specialized in covering business and technology for online and print readers and speaking at industry events. A recipient of numerous regional and national awards, Huff holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Brigham Young University and a Masters Degree from the University of Alabama.

33 comments
gearjmmr
gearjmmr

I must agree with Ghostrider96988! If an OTR driver is making approximately 18.60 per hour while doing a job way more intricate and time-consuming than someone driving a truck in construction or oilfield work; and the construction or oilfield driver is making between $18 at entry level and $22-$26 with experience and a Hazmat endorsement, what does that say about the OTR side of the industry as a whole? I live in an area that is experiencing the fracking boom expected to last some 11 years. Entry level drivers graduating out of school are being scooped up by oilfield companies and reporting back that they are working long hours and making between $6,000 and $7,000 a month with a lot more time than an OTR driver spends at home.  Their reports are verified by their checkstubs.

 

Granted, the economy is a series of links that must undoubtedly feel any changes made at any level or place in that chain. In order for OTR companies to pay more money to their drivers, they must charge more for their services. We are all consumers; therefore, we will all feel the impact of those increases. There is no one in the supply chain that will absorb the cost and decrease their bottom line just so that drivers can make a better wage. That is not the premise of supply and demand. We must be realistic in our assessment of the problem and its possible solutions.

 

I do not pretend to be the sharpest tool in the shed, but I do not see any other way to make a better wage possible for OTR drivers. The problem with this solution is that it will trigger inflation because every link in the chain will automatically increase the cost of its service to get its "due" share of the new wealth being generated. This will exacerbate an already ongoing chain reaction with every cycle. Where does the madness end? Who cares when the common working person is the one who usually ends up with the left-over nickles and dimes?  OTR drivers are an essential part of the supply chain. They are willing to sacrifice many things that many others are not. They may be on a run while others are having a cookout on the 4th of July with their families because it is what the job demands.

 

The problem with most OTR drivers is that they have bought into a self-defeating ideology that states, "You can't get two drivers to agree on anything!" To which I say, "Horse Pucky!" 

 

Ladies and gentlemen: We have a problem that affects us as OTR Drivers regardless of what age, color, size or gender we are! Let's cut out the BS and understand which side our bread is buttered on! We can be a force to be reckoned with! Tudaloo and Happy Trails! 

 

Ghostrider96988
Ghostrider96988

This may help. your making .31cpm and you driving 65mph you should be able to make 60 miles in one hour, That makes you making 18.60 per hour, Good money for a truck driver. That is what big bussiness is looking at. BUT here is where the problem is you only get paid from city to city not paid driving through the city, Not paid for fueling your truck, Not paid for loading or unloading or waiting for you load. HOS? You have 4 hours left to drive on your 11 hour clock and where you have to unload is down a two-lane road your thinking it will take you some where around 5 to 6 hours to get there so you know you will have to find some where down the road to take your breake  but where, You get down to two hours left on your time and start looking for a place and now it is getting dark you come into town its a small town no where to park so you keep going 1 hour left 30 min still no where to park now your on a dark two lane out in the middle of no where 15 min your EOBR is going of telling you it time to stop if you keep going to find a place to park ( now it don't have to be a safe place it just has to be a place) you go over your 11 hours now your in trouble with the company because they do not understand how it works out there.It has got to be taken out of the company and shippers hands and put into the drivers hand. But befor that can happen we got to have drivers out here that can work responble and not try to make all the money in one week. See this is what I have been trying to get across to them for years but it fall on deaft ears they let some one in a office tell they what they are going to do, It should be the other way the drivers tells them when it can be picked up and delivered. Until trucking gets drivers out there that can do this it will not change. I kinda think your big trucking company like to hire dum-a** drivers so they can use this as a excuse to make the changes. Drivers working (company drivers) that has 10 or more in trucking and is gone from home for 2 weeks at a time should be making 75000.00 to 80000.00 per year working 70 hours a week.

mike jr
mike jr

in 1938 congress passed a law that created the forty hour work week requiring employers to pay time & one-half for all time worked > 40 hrs.  they exempted truck drivers in that law.   everyone else in the usa is on a 40 hr work week while drivers are expected to and for the most part required to work 60 per week to make a living.  who wants to do that? when you add being out on the road 6 days a week, eating and showering in dirty truck stops and kissing some shipper or receivers butt on daily basis so you can get loaded or unloaded, i would think it got very old very quickly.  everyone can hide their head in the sand but until the industry starts treating drivers with some financial respect, there is going to be driver shortages and it is going to get worse as the economy improves.  i have never driven but i know a lot of owner operators that do.  why they do it, i will never know.

Vocalone
Vocalone

The trucking industry should be regulated by the government -PERIOD. The government then sets the rates shippers must pay to owner operators (cpm /100% FSC paid by shipper, detention, layover, eqp ordered not used...). Then cut the Freight brokers (middle man out) -mandating that shippers should manage their own capacity -select carrier directly for loads and pay when load is delivered!!! This crap about waiting 30-45 days and quick pay programs are what's killing the industry -shippers are earning dividends on the Owner Operators money while causing the Owner Operators limited operating capital to deplete -totally diminish, and forcing them out of business -this is a Wall Street business model -rob the average man from earning an honest living to line their own pockets and take Caribbean cruises.

Next  -the large trucking companies are thieves and they too should be regulated by the government as to what they pay company drivers, and oh the government should make lease purchase totally illegal. If a driver wants to be an Owner Operator go finance your own darn truck with a bank the traditional way. Your credit shot -go lay bricks because you have no sense of responsibility and management skills, and it takes both skills to own and operate a truck business. Yes owning a truck is a business -thats why they are called commercial trucks, not recreational vehicles.

 

Ideally the government should regulate the trucking industry to one owner one truck PERIOD. Banks will begin to offer real good rates for owner operator businesses.

Government should (a) regulate that a truck only operate a total distance of 300 miles per day (8 hours a day to include load/unload/shipper delay), and regulate the shippers to paying accordingly so the driver works a 40 hour week for a weekly salary that is directly in line with cost of living for the driver's base state, (b) mandate that shipper maintain distribution centers/micro distribution centers in every state they ship to, and that the shipper is the one that pays the 2290 HVUT directly to the government based on utilized truck capacity.

So the bottom line the trucking associations are only speaking in their interest and not in the interest of the single owner operators that have their own equipment.

 

A matter of fact the government should have total exemptions and incentives for single equipment Owner Operators. exemptions such as operating within a 500 mile radius and not having to follow HOS, only requirement would be maintaining driving and maintenance logs. This way a driver could go out with a load and come back empty to home base to get reloaded, or take a back haul, or a head haul etc.

 

I am not for the government in everything and everybody's business. But I am all for them regulating the trucking business crooks. I have $60,000 worth of equipment and all this BS private industry/private trucking companies special interests groups and what's best for them really do hurt my business.

I should be able to sue the government as a single owner operator for them causing me undue hardship in earning a livelihood as a single owner operator. Is trucking a club for only larger trucking companies. What about the American dream -the right to provide a living for oneself and family.

 

So the bottom line is Owner Operators only talk and never take any action to make a change. So because of all this BS my equipment is underutilized, my earning potential limited and diminished, and so I must rely on other sources of income -like the wife working two jobs because I cannot have a second job working 20 -30 hours and still drive a truck because I will be in HOS violations. What BS -does this all make sense? Can I line some politicians pockets and have them look the other way while I have my way and do my thing. LOL!!! Trucking. I guess I only run two loads a week just because I love trucking -nothing else. Heck I don't run some weeks at all, and I am not even semi-retired.

 

Rickwill
Rickwill

Everyone makes a valid point BUT miss the big one. Truck rates and driver pay hasn't kept up with inflation, look at what an auto-worker was making in 1970 and a driver's wage back then. Now compare the two today, that's the problem not the reg's. Drivers don't want their time reduced because it effects their income BUT if we were paid like the rest of the work force a 32 hour week would be excellent, especially with more money than we're getting now. Trucks regardless of being O/O or company should all be paid minimum $65.00 per hour waiting time after first half hour. An old timer told me back in the 70's whatever fuel is at your mileage rate must co-incide, STILL WAITING

Ghostrider96988
Ghostrider96988

I keep hearing the drivers talk about the HOS (the old way, the now way, and now the new way) and it will not work for one reason or another. What I don't here is any one of you coming up with a new idea that will work, Now don't give me a lame idea you have to think it through and then (here comes the part that will never work) STAND TOGATHER as ONE VOICE and make it law. Out of the 10 million drivers out there take 500 of them and ask them if this would work and you would be lucky if you ger 50 of them to agree, So as long as your house is devided it will surly fall. So when none of you 10 million drivers can't agree on any thing but to disagree that is where the Goverment will make to rules for you so LIVE with it and stop crying. I drove for 33 years and two years ago I left because of this crap. Learn how to stand togather and have one voice and the rest is easy. I know how to make that happen but first you have to stand togather, until then let your Goverment and Big trucking company lead you.

nlights
nlights

The answer is right in front of us all .unified across the board SHUT DOWN!!! park the trucks first for 4 days and dont buy any fuel or move, You will see the rules and laws changed and the rates will go up. We dont have anything to lose right now, they have taken just about everything from us. I'm about ready to get out also if something doesnt change. As a owner/operator the amount of overhead cost and the rates makes it one of the lowest paying business's to be in, and the most controled and regulated

MikeJones4
MikeJones4

In todays dollars...accounting for this massive inflation where everything continues to go Up

in price...Drivers dont earn enuff money to purchase a real HOME..like ordinary foks do...

we to rent or live in our trucks.....its funny that they get so many SUCKERS to join this idiotic

industry. Sooner or later the driver pay will have to INCREASE and it aint happened YET...alot

of TALK about PAY increase but no ACTION......people are LEAVING because it simply is not

Worth hanging around.......

MikeJones4
MikeJones4

Yep the Pay already sucks..this will make it Worse.

Erick Steyer
Erick Steyer

I agree that the FMCSA needs to back off the regulations on Drivers and needs to start looking at the brokers shippers receivers and companies that have no regard for the hard work that Drivers do. Some regulations on these folks would be well received and would help the industry. For those interested go check out the following sites for those on facebook  truckdriverbillofrights@groups.facebook.com for those that don't have any use for FaceBook Here is the offical website https://sites.google.com/site/truckdriverbillofrights.

bigred713
bigred713

Hopefully this will push us over the "edge" and we can do what we have wanted to do for a long time,,,Unite, stop the trucks and then let the feds drive them...Seriously , just 2 days of all us doing a 34 hour reset will have a dramatic effect and it`s time we worked together,,,

Cliff Downing
Cliff Downing

Anyone who is actually naive enough to think that the government will "back off" of anything is not breathing oxygen.  The new HOS is not that bad. Like has been stated, one can go back to the way it was done from 1939 to 2003 and run the recap and run 70/8 accordingly. OMG!  What did we ever do before the recap came along?  Nothing ever got moved.  We lost WW II, we lost the Cold War, we never were able to get to the moon, people were starving in the streets because no food ever go delivered, etc.  And a silly 1/2 hr taken between the 3rd and 8th hr?  Anyone with a little ingenuity can turn that into something pretty productive.  30 min can be used up pretty quick going to the can, getting a bite and thermos refill, booking the next day's load, catching up the accounting (for the O/O), etc.  Only those, like the mega carriers and billy bob big riggers that haven't yet figured out how to manage time effectively will be ham strung by the new HOS.  For many of us, this is hardly a blip on the radar.  And unlike this "brotherhood of truckers that need to take back the industry" rot, I am a business man that operates a truck.  I have no sympathy for those that are not able to willing find a solution to a problem.  To not do so is down right un-American.  Our ancestors made it thru tougher times than we have it, and those that have a "can do" attitude will do it also.  I am so glad that many of the folks whining and complaining were not assigned to my unit in the Army.  We would never have won a firefight.

ironclad
ironclad

We all know what needs to happen, The Trucking industry needs to stop all transportation for as long as it takes to get the Feds attention, which we all know wont take long, and then revise the whole HOS BS to make it more reasonable. The next thing that needs to happen is that we need to stop transporting frieght for little of nothing and take better care of the drivers. The large companies are not doing anyone any favors by cutting  throats on transport cost. Everyone should come together and stand solid on cost of hauling. It is time to take back control of our industry. By the way, not only am I a  trucking company owner I am a 28 year veteran Paramedic, and I can stand here and testify that I respond to VERY,VERY, few accidents involving tractor trailors. The regulations should be leveied againts the four wheeling community, not the trucking industry.

old school 54
old school 54

it's the goverment it's all about control. it has never be about safety,they want to lead us around like sheep. they have no idea about the trucking industry and yet they want to tell us how it should be ran. let some people the understand the industry tell them whats best (and not just company execs.) i have watched this industry go straight to hell cause of all the inexperience. And all the assinie regs

BSTRANSINC
BSTRANSINC

OK people let look at this from the back side.. The SAFER this business gets the MORE regs we live with... As others have said they want you to change how you sleep.. Spend your off time.. And quite frankly how your life your life in general.. I have been in this business for over 35 years.. Have owned trucks for over 32 years... As others have said here there is NOTHING the CSA has done for safety.. When you accused of something you beat in court.. It's STILL on your CSA... And there is NO WAY get it off been there TRIED to do that. Lets face it... THIS IS ABOUT MONEY!! NOT safety!!! It's the GOV trying to fix something.... Think about it.. If the door handle on A gov house is bad they tear down the house to replace the door handle!! Hence the reason they don't approach the shippers and receivers on this issue.. It is the root prob in all of it all... We are held to the rules and they don't have ANY!!! And don't anyone say just run legal we ALL know that doesn't work because it's unrealistic in today's world with the shippers and receivers not be accountable..   

     We truly are ALL going to be looking for A job soon. And your right about going back to A recap.. It IS the only way to deal with this.. BUT, Most DOT cops DON'T know anything other than A reset!!! And when it's NOT there they do not know how to recap.. Truly GOD help us all in this.. 

JStephens
JStephens

I think the new HOS rules immediate effect will be to push a lot of operations and drivers to just revert back to old 8 day / 70 hour rolling work week like we did before the 34 hour restart went into effect. Most of our drivers make it home weekly, but with a possible 2 days off and still not getting a restart the rolling work schedule becomes the only real option. We have been losing new driver applicants for some time now, but as of right now it’s hard to tell if that is caused by a change in the industry or the oilfields continual hiring. That said I do agree that all of the new regs including the HOS revisions, EOBRs and increased enforcement through CSA is keeping a lot of potentially qualified new drivers from ever entering the field.

DOTDoctor
DOTDoctor

Every new set of rules cost the industry good veteran drivers.  Even my local drivers (O/Os) are going to feel the squeeze from this.  It will come down to service to key accounts only.  No 200 mile runs because that means an EOBR.  We must stay within our area and that is DFW metro only.  Since drivers are off most weekends, that allows for the 34 hour restart if they don't work an early morning on Sat or Monday (considering Sunday is off).  This is going to hurt us all.  Yes, shippers/receivers need to value our time.  One of my main receiving locations constantly holds up my drivers.  They just don't care no matter how many times I have spoken with them.  Same happens at another big loading facility.  I am sure we are sharing these same stories.  Collectively we need to make a stand to stop this behavior.  Even the "big dogs" are now going to feel the bite.  There has to be political motivation (as others have stated) behind all this and not just a so called "safety" concern.  These measured do not improve safety but just force good drivers out of the profession and force drivers to drive when tired.  I still say that the HOS NEEDS REVISION; proper revision, adequate revision and with incite from industry vets.  We need rules for each trucking group instead of this one size "does not" fit all mentality.  If not, the alternative is rail, shuttle loads or as US Xpress states - much shorter length of hauls.

BarbRRB
BarbRRB

I have said for the past 5 years with all the Government changes and the money spent with regulations and not to educate drivers and companies. Fines and tickets are their answer. Government tells us how our bodies are to function as a whole and not independently with HOS. From local 10 hour/5 days a week drivers to regional drivers to OTR drivers.  The harassment out there is unforgiving today than it was in the 80's & 90's. Today I work part time & a local driver and thankful!  I got out of a "full time" driver position in 1997 and do not regret it at all.  Veteran drivers are throwing their hands up, most of them are ticket free with great driving records, I am one of them. God Bless the drivers who continue to pound the pavement with no respect. You have my total support!

John McNeilly
John McNeilly

These changes will affect productivity but not safety. Is anyone else getting the idea that this is about something other than safety? For example, complicating the rules so badly that reasonable people say "Enough!" and leave the industry, creating a start of a crisis that can only be solved by the influx of Mexican trucks and/or completely open borders? Or to drive experienced people out so that the "only" way to fill the void is to legalize the illegals? Or is this another indicator of something more nefarious in nature, to create a transportation/food crisis to be exploited for other political means? I do not trust our government and haven't for a while. Non-productive rulings such as this sometimes don't have a directly visible effect, but they do have a cumulative effect of stressing the system, and the people in it. Whatever the reason, this is NOT about safety. Elections have consequences, folks. Wake UP!!!

twsop
twsop

One area that needs to be addressed, that could help off-set the costs, would be time spent at the dock.  Shipper's and Consignee's have no regard for time carriers spend at their docks.  Even if the Carrier has an appointed time, they still wait hours for unloading.  Some consignee's actually charge the Carrier to unload them.  This is not lumpers.  This is an charge for unloading w/forklift.  Some warehouses actually charge a fee if you have to re-schedule delivery.  No matter what the reason.  Carrier's are abused and it is very costly, not to mention the stress on HOS.  This for your information.

 

Concerned Carrier,

 

Timothy W. Soper

President

Transportation & Warehouse Services, Inc

d/b/a TWS

Indianapolis, IN 46219

317.786.5791

Doing business since 1990.

 

Joseph Hilleary
Joseph Hilleary

If all of the major carriers would stand behind the owner ops then we would have a chance to get the Goverment to back off and get out of our affairs there are to many regs poping up by people that don't belong to this industry,they say its all about safety but if we are to address safety lets look at both sides and start cracking down on autos as well its unbelivable the things I see every day and after 36 years I've had just about enough. The Goverment needs to put people in rule making positions that understand not people that have an axe to grind. So far I haven't seen the fmcsa do anything that represents our industry they are doing things for all of the safty groups!!!

Ghostrider96988
Ghostrider96988

 @gearjmmr

 Well said.... The part I like best is WE the drivers "Are the force" in numbers we can make a differance if we talk the same thing and were asking for the same changes. Once we can agree on that all it would take is just 15 mins to get some attenion then from there we WILL BE HEARD. Ponder this. Big companys. Let me just pick a trucking from the air umm JB Hunt we all know them. Let say they are running 2000 trucks (this is just me est,ok) 2000 trucks today they are charging 1.30 per mile and the EST load is paying 500 miles there company is making how much a hour? and now we can understand why they can afford to spend 1500.00 per unit to up grade to the new EOBR and the like. The way I see it we do not have to charge more to run up and down the road we just need the BIG Trucking companys to pay us more. I may be wrong But I'm just thinking aloud.

DOTDoctor
DOTDoctor

 @Vocalone You have great ideas and make some really valid points.  I recall when deregulation occurred.  There was good and bad to it.  Wish I was a little older to remember it better because from what I see in this industry today; it has been nothing back going downhill since it occurred.  Perhaps someone older than I, that better recalls regulated trucking, can share some of their expertise.  We defiantly need something to give.  Be a small trucking co or an O/O; it is almost impossible to not be eaten alive by the "big boys".

Ghostrider96988
Ghostrider96988

Rickwill. Yes i do agree with you that the money the drivers is making this day is wrong. Back in the 1980 when I started driving I was making .21cpm was home ever week-end and was bringing home 370.00 to 420.00 a week working from 05:00 to maybe 16:30 to 17:00. Now I was last working for Heartland Express working arounf 65 to 70 hours a week and was home ever two weeks for 34 hours bringing home 625.00 to 700.00 then when I got finish paying for health insuarnce it would be around 500.00. If I was working as a heavy equipment operator making 15.00 a hour at 70 hours a week 1275.00 a week after paying for health insuarnce I bring home 1125.00 and I'm at home ever night with my family, not having to pay 15.00 a meal x 2 or 3 times a day living in a tin can. But until we can get these dum a_ _ new truck drivers to under stand this it will not change. One voice, One plan we have to stand togather and that will never happen. Let me say this. Air traffic controler (atc) talking to a pilot on plane 111. (atc) pilot 111 your cleared to land on runway 12. 111 says atc I can't land on runway 12 their is a pipper club sitting there. (atc) 111 I said to land on 12 now pilot statrs to land on 12 hit the pipper club all on board are killed. Who is at falut. atc is because he told the pilot to land where he should not have landed. FAA (your Goverment) investagates finds Pilot was at fault. Pilot was doing what he was told to do.

 Dispatcher Greg is talking to his driver Jim. (Greg) Jim I need you to pick up this hot load tonight befor 1700 and it pays 475 miles so is has got to be delivered by 0700 in the morning. (Jim) Greg I can't do that I have just run all night and half the day just to get here in time to be unloaded and now your needing me to run another 250 miles to pick up this hot load and heve it delivered by 0700 you know it 1200 and I have been running all night right? (Greg) what are you telling me Jim your not going to pick this load up? (Jim) Greg I'm telling you that I need some rest I'm very tried. (Greg) Jim this load has got to be picked up befor 1700 are you going to do it or not? (Jim) NO I'm not I'm telling you I'm sleepy and tired I need some rest. (Greg) Jim PICK THIS LOAD UP OR BRING YOUR TRUCK TO THE YARD, and you can find someone other then this company to work for, and I will report to DAC that you refused to work. (Jim) OK Greg I will pick it up but you know how tired I am so if some thing happens its on you......... (Greg) ok. Later that night Jim hits a car kills a family of 4. DOT investagates finds Jim at fault. I said all of that to ask you this Where is the big problem in trucking.

Ghostrider96988
Ghostrider96988

 @nlights

 nlights shut down the trucks for "FOUR DAYS" hahahahaha you don't get it do you. Stop and think about it. You have got to be a company driver. four days. It so much simply then that you can do all you need to do it GET THIS 15 min. read my comment I posted at the top.

bigred713
bigred713

 @Erick Steyer the broker,shippers,etc. dont make the rules when it comes to us being able to work,sleep, etc....Our biggest problem is being pushed when we know we are tired, the big cos. are behind all this as what is happening is their version of a time card...That`s a truckers worst enemy.

twsop
twsop

10/4 on that....Unity

TWSop

Bob_Hearns
Bob_Hearns

Cliff, you say you are a problem solver. Give the night drivers your easy solution to work around their 34 hour restart that looks like it will become a 58 hour restart. I'm sure it will be greatly appreciated. After all, as you say, it would be un-American not to do so.

Bob_Hearns
Bob_Hearns

 @DOTDoctor My view precisely. These rule makers are either willfully ignorant  or incompetent. It may very well be both.

Vocalone
Vocalone

 @Ghostrider96988 This is why Trucking needs to be regulated by the government. Shippers and trucking companies must be held accountable for their flight plans. Flight plans must be electronically logged into a Government database as dispatched to driver X with driver X having Y hours left to legally run a load. This way when driver X causes a fatality, the trucking company and the shipper are held accountable because they both stood to gain (profit) before the unfortunate fatality -call it the "Safe Transportation Accountability Act."

nlights
nlights

 @Ghostrider96988

 No I'm not a company driver!! and yes I do get it ... I've been driving out here for 30 years and have seen the continues change in the laws and regulation of this Industry.. Its the most regulated and controled by State and Federal laws , and yes its about Money and not safety. But the rates suck , the brokers are raping us and the state and fed's are making it almost not worth being in this industry anymore! But until we stop the trucks they are all going to continue to pass more regulation and laws.. and the rates will continue to go down , and the fuel prices will continue to go up along with all the other operating cost there are to run one of these trucks and trailers down the road ,that until the public doesnt get there freight nothing will get done to change things. Nothing else has worked .... Sooner or later its got to happen to open the eyes of everyone from the public to the state Gov and lawenforcement to the federal government.

 

 

nlights
nlights

 @Ghostrider96988

 yes I agree , There has to be atleast 50% to 75% to make a differance have a great day

Ghostrider96988
Ghostrider96988

 @nlights

 Yes I do agree with you comment, and here is the problem getting ever driver to stand togather for one cause to make the needed changes, But befor they can stand togather they need to know what they are standing togather for. To get just 80% of the drivers to agree is impossible to do, If they would then and only then it could change. My self has drove for 33 years and 2 years ago I got out of it because of this kind of crap. We the smart drivers ( like you and myself) we can not get the new drivers to understand this. Thanks for responding to my post.

Must Clicks

Events