How will the 2002 emissions rules change your buying?

user-gravatar

“I’m not ready to step up to that new equipment, so nothing will change in 2002. I don’t really know what will happen. There’s not enough information at this point that I can gather to make a good decision. I think with the price of trucks and cheap freight, you have to stick with what you have.”
– Jimmy Bearden, owner
J&B Trucking, Gunnison, Colo.

“Right now the new emissions rule will not really affect us at all. Our buying is more affected by the used truck market. The value you gain with buying newer used trucks exceeds the value of emissions right now.”
– Ed Ruhe, vice president of operations
Classic Carriers Inc., Versailles, Ohio.

“I’m not that familiar with it. We’re pretty much Mack truck buyers, so I don’t think that will change.”
– Marnie Ward, fleet manager
Columbia Grain, Wellborn, Fla.

“To give you an honest answer, I don’t know. The reason why is we don’t own a lot of newer stuff. It won’t affect us for a couple of years.”
– Larry DeJong, owner
DeJong Trucking Co. Inc., Ripon, Calif.

“I’m very familiar with that, but it is hard to explain. All manufacturers have to meet standards set by the government and federal regulations, but it will not change our buying much. It will drop the efficiency by retarding the engines, but there is not much effect on our purchasing of new equipment. It’s going to cut the already poor mileage we’re getting. We will still purchase new trucks. The Peterbilt and Mack trucks we buy will all have engines that are competitive to meet the standards. It’s just another case of the government going against our industry. We’re paying an already high price for diesel fuel and now we’ll get fewer miles per gallon. That’s the government – it’s just one thing after another.”
– Jim Peter, co-owner
E.J. Peter Trucking Co. Inc., Wausau, Wis.

“What we’ll try to do is buy engines that are prior to that new rule taking place.”
– Vernon Garner, president
Garner Transportation Group, Findlay, Ohio

“I don’t think it will make a difference. We really don’t have a choice but to buy new trucks. After a period of time, you have to consider down time. You have to stick with a trade cycle. It’s important for driver retention and taxes. Also, most trucking companies accelerate their depreciation on a 3-year life. These issues are pushing us. Last year, the trade cycle was down – we held off on some units because of used truck prices. But we really don’t have a choice but to buy new equipment. Fortunately, because of the slowness of truck sales, factories are more aggressive with pricing.”
– Joe Ford, controller
Walpole Inc., Okeechobee, Fla.

“We’ve not given it a whole lot of thought. At first we thought it would speed up our buying, but right now with things the way they are, other things are taking precedence over our buying decisions. Right now I don’t see it making a huge impact. Initially, we started thinking that it might dictate our buying trends, but we’ve taken a different direction.”
– Steve Hoekstra, manager
Wm. Hoekstra and Sons Inc., St. Anne, Ill.

“I’ll be sticking with the old engine styles for right now.”
– Arnold Bridgeman, president
B&B Mechanical Transport Co., Evansville, Ind.

“It will basically depend on how the new engines will perform. We’re a Cummins company. We’re very confident that Cummins will follow through and adapt to the new rules. We’ll still buy new trucks like always. We think the cost difference will be outweighed by the improvements in fuel economy and emissions.”
– Lee Neal, vice president
Sunlynn Enterprises Inc., Dallas, Ga.

“I won’t buy. I don’t know how that stuff is going to perform. It bothers me that the government forced a deal under the Clinton administration. Instead of working forward, they crammed it down our throats. I don’t think the industry is going to be ready. I’m not willing to buy into experimental stuff.”
– Scott McElmurry, president
MST Freight Services, Inc., Lakeland, Fla.

Question: What causes you the most stress at work? Respond by
e-mail to ahuff@eTrucker.com or fax to (205) 248-1046.