Diesel continues streak of flat pricing

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Updated Feb 22, 2017

Diesel prices in the week ending February 20 continued the modest pricing changes seen so far this year. Following a seven-tenths of a cent increase, the U.S. average price for a gallon of on-highway diesel is now $2.572. Prices have remained within a 3-cent window throughout the entirety of the year.

Prices increased in all regions except New England, which saw a one-cent decrease during the week.

The nation’s most expensive diesel can be found in California at $2.966 per gallon, followed by the Central Atlantic region at $2.77 per gallon.

The cheapest fuel can be found in the Gulf Coast at $2.433 per gallon, followed by the Midwest region at $2.495 per gallon.

Prices in other regions, according to the DOE, are:

  • New England – $2.658
  • Lower Atlantic – $2.521
  • Rocky Mountain – $2.548
  • West Coast less California – $2.767

ProMiles’ numbers during the same week showed the opposite of the Department of Energy with a decrease in diesel prices of eight-tenths of a cent to $2.507 per gallon nationwide.

The biggest discrepancies between the DOE’s prices and Promiles’ numbers are in California, where Promiles has prices 6.6 cents cheaper at $2.90 per gallon; West Coast less California, where Promiles has 5.9 cents cheaper at $2.708 per gallon; and New England, where Promiles has prices 5.3 cents higher at $2.711 per gallon.

According to ProMiles’ Fuel Surcharge Index, the most expensive diesel can be found in California at $2.90 per gallon, and the cheapest can be found in the Gulf Coast region at $2.427 per gallon.