Electronic DVIRs shed paper, improve compliance

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Updated Sep 15, 2014

Brakes, lights and tires are the most common maintenance violations caught by DOT inspectors at roadside and fixed locations. In theory, drivers should be catching these and more defects before DOT officers make discoveries.

Click here or the photo above to view the latest options for electronic driver vehicle inspections. Photo courtesy of IntermecClick here or the photo above to view the latest options for electronic driver vehicle inspections. Photo courtesy of Intermec

Part of the problem may be using paper forms to comply with regulations for post-trip (396.11) and pre-trip (396.13) vehicle inspections from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Are the forms getting to the maintenance department in time to schedule repairs? Are drivers “pencil whipping” their reports and not doing walk around inspections? Whenever paper is involved the answers are uncertain.

Since the arrival of the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program, electronic driver vehicle inspection reports (DVIRs) have become a popular method to improve CSA scores. These simple applications make it easy and efficient for drivers to note defects and to schedule repairs.

Electronic vehicle inspections can be deployed in a number of ways. Click below to evaluate three options:

Using mobile devices>>

Using integrated workflow>>

Managing service events>>

To see the latest hardware and software options for electronic vehicle inspections, click here