First fuel cell Kenworths set for arrival in California ports this month

The first two fuel cell electric heavy duty Class 8 trucks built under the Zero and Near Zero Emissions Freight Forwarding (ZANZEFF) project sponsored by the state of CA are preparing for delivery to demonstration fleet customers.The first two fuel cell electric heavy duty Class 8 trucks built under the Zero and Near Zero Emissions Freight Forwarding (ZANZEFF) project sponsored by the state of CA are preparing for delivery to demonstration fleet customers.

The first two fuel cell electric Kenworth T680 trucks built under the Zero and Near Zero Emissions Freight Forwarding (ZANZEFF) project will arrive at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach this month.

Toyota Logistics Services and Southern Counties Express each will receive a Toyota fuel cell powered electric drivetrain T680 tractor for use in drayage operations in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

“After extensive testing with our proof-of-concept prototypes, we’re ready for the next step of putting more trucks into drayage operations,” said Andrew Lund, chief engineer of Toyota Research and Development.

Southern Counties Express President Gordon Reimer said the company has long been involved with Toyota’s hydrogen truck project, “and we are excited to see the latest models now being released for further testing.”

Another eight trucks will be delivered in 2021 as part of the ZANZEFF program. Three trucks will go to United Parcel Service (CCJ Top 250, No. 1) for its port operations, two will go to Total Transportation Services, and Toyota Logistics Services will receive three additional trucks.

Development of the Kenworth T680 FCEV is part of a $41 million Zero and Near-Zero Emissions Freight Facilities (ZANZEFF) grant awarded by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), with the Port of Los Angeles as the prime applicant. CARB has awarded those funds to the Port of Los Angeles for the ZANZEFF project as part of California Climate Investments, a California initiative that puts billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy and improving public health and the environment.

Chris Cannon, chief sustainability officer for the Port of Los Angeles, said the port is currently engaged in 16 different zero-emission demonstration projects to support development of zero-emission on-road trucks.