Diesel prices close 2021 with 7-week decline

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Updated Jan 14, 2022

Trucking news and briefs for Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022:

Diesel prices fall to close out 2021

The U.S.’ national average for a gallon of on-highway diesel fell by 12.1 cents since hitting the 2021 high mark in mid-November, according to the Department of Energy, to close out a year that saw prices rise by more than a dollar per gallon through the first 11 months.

Fuel prices during the last week of the year, the week ending Jan. 3, averaged $3.613 per gallon across the country, which was 97 cents higher than the same week a year ago.

The national average for a gallon of diesel has dropped for seven consecutive weeks since peaking at $3.734 during the week ending Nov. 15.

Last week saw fuel prices hold mostly steady across the country, with the most significant increase being seen in the West Coast less California, which saw a 1-cent increase; and the most significant decrease being seen in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices fell by 1.7 cents.

The nation’s most expensive diesel can be found in California at $4.758 per gallon, followed by the West Coast less California region at $3.927 per gallon.

The cheapest fuel is in the Gulf Coast region at $3.328 per gallon, followed by the Midwest region at $3.477 per gallon.

Prices in other regions, according to DOE, are:

  • New England – $3.622
  • Central Atlantic – $3.781
  • Lower Atlantic – $3.49
  • Rocky Mountain – $3.687

ProMiles’ numbers during the same week saw fuel prices fall by seven-tenths of a cent, bringing its national average to $3.498 per gallon.

According to ProMiles’ Fuel Surcharge Index, the most expensive diesel can be found in California at $4.641 per gallon, and the cheapest can be found in the Gulf Coast region at $3.29 per gallon.

Yokohama increasing tire prices next month

In response to the continued rise in operational costs, Yokohama Tire Corporation announced it will implement a price increase on its commercial truck tires and consumer replacement tires sold in the U.S., effective February 1.

The company did not disclose the percentage increase it will be implementing.